Posts Tagged ‘sand’

Blue Lagoon Safari Tour

Thursday, March 13th, 2008

This unique guided 4W.D. tour takes you to the crystal clear waters of the Blue Lagoon. The Blue Lagoon is located south of the Cape Moreton lighthouse on the eastern side of Moreton Island. The lake covers 42 hectares and is the largest freshwater lake on the island. Originally it was created by the gradual sand dune movement which over time formed the catchment. It is actually called a “window lake” as the underwater table is at the surface. It is not fed by water from rivers or streams but by underground aquifers. There is an estimated 2.5thousand million cubic meters of water stored here.

The tour by 4 W.D. bus travels along the beach from the Tangalooma Resort to the Wrecks. It then turns towards the Eastern beach using the 7k’s of middle road. Our guide offers pleasant commentary on the islands flora and fauna. Once we arrive at our destination it is a short walk on the squeaky clean sand to the beckoning crystal clear waters of theBlue Lagoon. Along the path you can see much of the islands local flora, such as the low brush box, coastal banksia, and sheoaks. The sight of this beautiful lake is breathtaking with it’s crystal clear blue water. The water laps the freshwater sedge which grow along the edge and there are many small birds darting amongst the bushes. This is a tranquil scene indeed. While you enjoy a relaxing swim your tour guide prepares a scrumptious snack of damper and tea and coffee. Swimming here is so relaxing and refreshing.

The tour takes 3hrs. and swimming costume,towel, hat, suncream, and camera are essential. Please book at the Tangalooma Tour Desk and check for the scheduled depatures.The cost is $48 for adults and $30 for children. This is the perfect way to relax and see nature at it’s very best.

Desert Safari tour

Tuesday, March 4th, 2008

The Tangalooma desert is enormous, about 42 hectares in size and quite devoid of vegetation. The sand is quite blinding in brightness, almost as if in a whiteout. The surrounding vegetation is quite typical of Moreton island Natives such as Fox tail ferns, Grass trees and Wallum and Coastal Banksia. As the bus winds  up the sand track it is a great surprise to find a desert with sand hills. The roads were originally built by the army during World War II as a means to get to the Ross Defence Battery on the Pacific Ocean side of the island. Along the way the guide gives geological information on the formation of this sand island which is the 3rd. largest in the world. There are coloured sands, which occur naturally in the desert in contrast to the ocean/beach sand which is a buff colour. The colours in these mineral bearing sands are yellow, red, brown, blue and black.

Now the fun begins as you step off the bus to toboggan down one of the larger sand hills on Moreton Island. the toboggans are pieces of masonite which when waxed, fly down the sand hills.The ride is pure fantastic fun, for all ages.

The Desert tour runs daily, all you need to do is contact the tour desk, at Tangalooma Resort to make a booking. Please remember to bring a hat, sunglasses, suncream and your camera.

Nature Walk

Friday, February 8th, 2008

A very pleasant walk is just 30 minutes north of the Resort and villas. It is equally beautiful in the morning, before the sun rises above the sand dunes/hills, or at sunset which is always a favourite with photographers. The wrecks are quite spectacular silhouetted as the sun sets quite often producing some brilliant colours. The directions are quite simply to follow the shoreline until you reach The Wrecks.

As well keep a watchful eye as you walk through the crystal clear waters or on the sand for seastars (starfish), and small fish. The “logs” are often a good fishing spot for flathead. There are often pods of dolphins swimming past and sometimes in the shallows. The whistling kites with their distinctive patterened wings, and call, soar overhead in search of their prey..unsuspecting fish. What a fantastic sight to see these birds of prey in action.

The twelve wrecks were once very seaworthy vessels , and now form an artifical reef which provides a safe haven for boats and yachts to anchor.

The wrecks